Naturally, it's Chlorophyll: Why Matcha is So Green

behind the scenes, green tea, matcha, Mizuba Tea Company -

Naturally, it's Chlorophyll: Why Matcha is So Green

By: Mizuba Tea Company

Chlrophyll: Greek, “chloros”  green + “phyllon,”  leaf. 

“Is this real?”

... Is a question you might hear when someone sees Matcha’s super green color. If you lived the ‘90s, then you might expect the tea’s hue to be a result of chemical enhancement (please tell me you all remember Flubber). But thankfully, Matcha lives up to its name as a very green tea thanks to one of nature’s more awesome functions – chlorophyll – a completely natural, beneficial nutritional pigment.

Chlorophyll is a catalyst for photosynthesis, helping plants absorb light for energy. Consider chlorophyll the green blood of Matcha tea – it keeps things moving along, just like blood in our own system. Interestingly enough, 1930 Nobel Prize winner, Hans Fischer, discovered chlorophyll’s chemical structure is remarkably identical to our red blood (hemoglobin).  Chlorophyll provides raw materials for the body to make hemoglobin. In turn, hemoglobin delivers oxygen throughout the body, which promotes good circulation for overall health and well-being.

Bamboo Tarps shading Mizuba Tea leaves in Uji, Japan.

So, why is Matcha so much brighter than other green plants?

Matcha is shade-grown. Bamboo tarps are hoisted over the tea plants up to four weeks before harvest. The tarps inhibit photosynthesis, causing the plants to concentrate large amounts of chlorophyll and other nutrients in the leaves. The leaves are then stone-ground, so you can enjoy 100% of the nutritional value of the tea when you drink a cup of pure, bright, and verdant tea leaf.

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